Rep. Michael McCaul (R-Texas) spoke to Bill Hemmer this morning to react to new information on the crash of a Russian passenger plane in Egypt.

U.S. and British intelligence authorities believe that a bomb was responsible for Saturday's crash, killing 224 people in the Sinai Peninsula.


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FoxNews.com reported:

Britain's Foreign Secretary said Thursday that there was a "significant possibility" that an affiliate of the Islamic State terror group brought down a Russian passenger plane in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula Saturday, killing 224 people.

The statement by Philip Hammond came hours after a U.S. intelligence source confirmed to Fox News that intelligence agencies have preliminary evidence, including intercepts, suggesting a bomb brought down Metrojet Flight 9268.

Still, a source tells Fox News the intelligence is not conclusive. Other than aviation fuel, no bomb residue has been found on the wreckage or victims, according to this source, who has been briefed on the latest findings.

ISIS has claimed responsibility on a social media account known to be used by the terror group. 

Russian President Vladimir Putin said at this point, there is not enough evidence to point to "just one theory." An Egyptian official has said definitively that the crash was an accident, not a terror attack. 

But McCaul said if it's true that ISIS brought down the plane, then he hopes that Putin will redirect his attacks in Syria. 

"If ISIS brought down a Russian aircraft, with Russians on it, you would hope the Russians would turn their [targeting] away from protecting the Assad regime and towards destroying and defeating ISIS in Syria," said McCaul, cautioning that an American airliner could be the target next time. 

Watch the interview above.


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