(Photo Credit: Greg Barnes Jr., Facebook)

A black motorist in Indiana used his traffic stop as an opportunity to spread a positive message about police officers. 

Greg Barnes Jr. was pulled over for speeding last week by a white state trooper, so - with the officer's permission - he took a selfie with him and posted it on Facebook.

He wrote: 

I was pulled over today for speeding. The officer did not know me nor did I know him, but we each showed one another a mutual display of respect in our interaction. He was doing his job, and I had made a mistake in trying to hurry home to get started moving that lead to our path's crossing. He ran my information, and in the end we talked more about how are individual days were going, and the situations and circumstances within our society that have lead to interactions such as he and I's to play out much more negatively, some even deadly, than ours, than we talked about the situation that lead to him pulling me over. In the end we both thanked each other for our mutual displays of respect and agreed to take a "selfie" together to help tell our story.
I can't stress enough that NO demographic and/or profession of people are all bad. Neither of us are the enemy. We can continue to fight against each other until we are literally "black and blue", or we can show one another the respect we inherently deserve, not as "black man" and "blue police officer", but as humans. None greater, none less...‪#‎Respect‬

His post has since been shared nearly a half-million times. 

WISH-TV caught up with the officer, Shawn Cosgrove, who said that he decided to pose for the picture because of the recent tensions across the country. 

“I think that’s the only race that should truly matter, the human race, and just us showing respect for one another in that interaction,” he said.


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