Robin Williams' wife, Susan Schneider, released a statement this afternoon, revealing for the first time that her husband had been in the early stages of Parkinson's Disease.

The 63-year-old comedy and acting legend committed suicide Monday at his home amid a struggle with depression.

Here is the full statement:

Robin spent so much of his life helping others. Whether he was entertaining millions on stage, film or television, our troops on the frontlines, or comforting a sick child — Robin wanted us to laugh and to feel less afraid.

Since his passing, all of us who loved Robin have found some solace in the tremendous outpouring of affection and admiration for him from the millions of people whose lives he touched. His greatest legacy, besides his three children, is the joy and happiness he offered to others, particularly to those fighting personal battles.

Robin’s sobriety was intact and he was brave as he struggled with his own battles of depression, anxiety as well as early stages of Parkinson’s Disease, which he was not yet ready to share publicly.

It is our hope in the wake of Robin’s tragic passing, that others will find the strength to seek the care and support they need to treat whatever battles they are facing so they may feel less afraid.

Read more below from FoxNews.com:

The Marin County coroner's office said Williams was last seen alive at home at about 10 p.m. Sunday. An emergency call from his house in Tiburon was placed to the Sheriff's Department shortly before noon Monday.

The coroner revealed on Tuesday that Williams committed suicide by hanging himself with a belt. He also had cuts on his wrist at the time of his death. 

A representative for Williams said in a statement the 63-year-old actor had been battling "severe depression of late."

Last month, the star of "Mork and Mindy," ''Good Will Hunting" and "Good Morning, Vietnam" said he was re-entering a 12-step program after months of nonstop work. His rep said the visit was meant to "fine tune" his sobriety, and it would have gone unnoticed had Williams' not posed for a photo with a fan at a Dairy Queen near the facility. 

The Academy-award winning actor had a successful career as a stand-up comedian and made generations laugh with his classic films, like “Mrs. Doubtfire.” He was also known for his tear-jereker roles in hits such as “Dead Poets Society.”

Williams is survived by his wife and his three children: daughter Zelda, 25; and sons Zachary, 31, and Cody, 22.