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As James Comey makes the media rounds to promote his new book, there are some questions that the mainstream media ask the former FBI director, according to Wall Street Journal columnist Kimberley Strassel.

On Monday and Tuesday, Strassel tweeted out 24 questions Comey should be asked in his interviews. She joined Laura Ingraham Tuesday night to run down some of the most pressing questions.

She said one of the top questions Comey needs to answer is: Did the FBI do any due diligence on Fusion GPS, the firm that hired former British counterintelligence agent Christoper Steele to compile the infamous anti-Trump dossier?

"This is an organization that exists to smear the reputations of political opponents," Strassel said. "Did you not care that it was the Clinton campaign and the DNC that had paid for what is essentially opposition research?"

She said she would also like to see Comey pressed on why he didn't inform President Trump that the dossier was funded by his political opponents.

Strassel said Comey should also answer questions about Peter Strzok and Lisa Page, the FBI officials caught sending anti-Trump text messages during the 2016 presidential election.

"Is this the kind of behavior that the FBI thinks is appropriate? Is it common behavior to have people sending messages like this? Does it concern you about the political bias?" she asked.

She added that the Strzok-Page texts raise questions about the integrity of the Hillary Clinton email investigation and the Russia probe.

Finally, she said Comey should be asked if former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe should be prosecuted for leaking to the press information related to the Clinton probe and then lying about it.


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