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Fox News contributor Tammy Bruce said on "Hannity" that after President Trump's first year, she believes the American people now fully understand the long-held biases of the mainstream media. 

She responded to a new Pew Research Center study, which found that the media's coverage of the Trump administration's first two months was 62 percent negative, more than three times higher than in 2009 when Barack Obama took office. 

"About six-in-ten stories on Trump’s early days in office had a negative assessment, about three times more than in early coverage for Obama and roughly twice that of Bush and Clinton. Coverage of Trump’s early time in office moved further away from a focus on the policy agenda and more toward character and leadership," the report from Pew stated.

Just five percent of the stories on the early days of the Trump presidency were seen as positive, compared to 42 percent for Obama in 2009 and 22 percent for George W. Bush in 2001. 

Bruce said this agenda is nothing new, but the emergence of Donald Trump has been the "perfect juxtaposition" against eight years of coverage of Barack Obama.

"It's been exposed. ... I think this has been the media's nature. I think it has done damage to this country for several generations," said Bruce, arguing that the bias goes back to Walter Cronkite's coverage of the Vietnam War.

Bruce said she believes Americans now "trust their instinct" more and look for multiple sources of news coverage. 

Former Democrat pollster Pat Caddell said no one needs studies to realize the change in posture by mainstream newspapers and TV networks.

He agreed that the media is not adversarial, but actually "oppositional" and "running its own narratives" against the president.

Watch the discussion above.


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