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Jesse Watters on Saturday debated a doctoral candidate from Penn State University, who contended that eating meat reinforces gender stereotypes.

As FoxNews.com reported, Anne DeLessio-Parson published an article in the "Journal of Feminist Geography" after studying Argentina's "meat-centric culture."

An academic journal has published an article by a Ph.D. candidate at Pennsylvania State University that argues eating meat maintains a society where “hegemonic masculinity” is the norm.

“I contend that in such a context, we cannot separate the ways people ‘do vegetarianism’ from how they ‘do gender,’” Anne DeLessio-Parson wrote. “Doing vegetarianism in interactions drives social change, contributing to the de-linking of meat from gender hegemony and revealing the resisting and reworking of gender in food spaces.”

DeLessio-Parson theorizes that being a vegetarian in the South American nation is a political act that contributes to the destabilization of the gender binary, or the view that there are only two sexes, masculine and feminine.

“[V]egetarians defy attempts to hold them accountable to gendered social expectations,” she wrote. “Women, for example, assert authority over their diets; men embody rejection of the meat-masculinity nexus by adopting a worldview that also rejects sexism and racism.”

On "Watters' World," Watters challenged her on the claim, and enjoyed a late-night snack during the debate.

DeLessio-Parson said Watters was slightly incorrect when he said consuming meat "creates toxic masculinity" because the phenomenon is "already there."

She said it "reinforces certain social structures, including patriarchy" through its "symbolism."

Watters then produced some symbolism of his own, as a producer laid a plate of steak -- "medium rare" -- in front of him.

"Is this bad -- that I'm eating meat?" he asked.

DeLessio-Parson said it would be more acceptable if he hunted or procured the meat himself, rather than "enjoying the benefit [with] the blood on someone else's hands."

"What if you're just hungry, and the animals are there for us to enjoy?" he asked.

Watch more above.


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