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Hillary Clinton’s pastor plagiarized the work of another minister in part of his new book, according to reports.

"Strong for a Moment Like This: The Daily Devotions of Hillary Rodham Clinton" is based on emails that Rev. Bill Shillady, of the United Methodist Church, sent to Clinton during her presidential campaign and just after her loss to Donald Trump.

Clinton appears on the cover of the book and even wrote a foreword praising Shillady and his writings.

But now it's been revealed that not all of the writings in the book are Shillady's own.


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CNN posted an excerpt from the book last week, featuring an email Shillady sent to Clinton the day after her shocking election loss titled "Sunday's Coming."

Rev. Matthew Deuel, of Mission Point Community Church in Winona Lake, Indiana, reached out to CNN after noticing striking similarities to a blog post he wrote in March 2016.

For example, Deuel wrote: "For the disciples and Christ followers in the first century, Good Friday represented the day that everything fell apart. All was lost. The momentum and hope of a man, claiming to be the Son of God, the Messiah who was supposed to change everything, had been executed."

Shillady's email to Clinton contains a nearly identical passage: "For the disciples and Christ's followers in the first century, Good Friday represented the day that everything fell apart. All was lost. The momentum and hope of a man claiming to be the Son of God, the Messiah who was supposed to change everything, had been executed."

Deuel also wrote: "Death will be shattered. Hope will be restored. Redemption is coming. But first, we must live through the darkness and seeming hopelessness of Friday."

Shillady's email to Clinton says: "Death will be shattered. Hope will be restored. But first, we must live through the darkness and seeming hopelessness of Friday."

CNN reported that Shillady echoed other ideas and phrases from Deuel's post as well, such as the notion that "life is filled with a lot of Fridays," times of trouble marked by jobs lost, friendships betrayed and bad medical diagnoses received.

Shillady apologized on Monday night, and Deuel said he accepts Shillady's apology and has no plans to seek legal action.

The publisher, Abingdon Press, said it will cite Deuel in future printings of the book.


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