Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-SC), a House Intelligence Committee member, said it's "too early" for some lawmakers to be calling for a special prosecutor to investigate the alleged ties between Russia and the Trump campaign. 

Speaking to Bill Hemmer in Washington, D.C., ahead of President Donald Trump's address to Congress tonight, Gowdy explained what Congress can and cannot do in this situation. 

"There is no special prosecutor statute. There is no independent counsel statute. There's a regulation that allows for the appointment of special counsel if the Department of Justice has a conflict and if all 92 U.S. attorneys have a conflict. Until that evidentiary burden has been satisfied, I don't know why Republicans or Democrats are talking about special counsel," he said.

"It's too early. Special counsel only applies to a criminal investigation," he said, adding that the FBI investigates crimes, not Congress.

Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA) made waves over the weekend by saying there should be a special prosecutor in this case, arguing that Attorney General Jeff Sessions -- an adviser to Trump throughout the campaign -- should recuse himself. 

On Monday, House Intelligence Committee chairman Devin Nunes (R-CA) said he has not seen evidence so far, other than press reports, to warrant a special prosecutor being used.

Gowdy said Nunes has been investigating Russia for years, "way before it became fashionable to talk about."

He joked that Hillary Clinton's campaign chief John Podesta "picked a password that the guy from [the movie] 'Slingblade' could have figured out."

"Russia didn't target the DNC. ... Russia targeted America," Gowdy said, adding that Moscow could have RNC documents in its possession as well.

Asked what he'd like to hear tonight from Trump before Congress, Gowdy said he'd "love to hear a message of unity."

"I think what unites us does surpass what divides us," he concluded.

Watch the interview above and tune in tonight on Fox News Channel for Trump's address.


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