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Syndicated columnist Charles Krauthammer reacted to the latest cache of Clinton campaign emails released by WikiLeaks, on Special Report.

As Ed Henry reported, a private law firm called to audit the Clinton Foundation wrote that "some interviewees found conflicts of those raising funds...some of whom may have the expectation of quid pro quo benefits in exchange for gifts".

Henry also reported that the Middle Eastern nation of Qatar donated $1 million to Bill Clinton, on behalf of the foundation, for his birthday, though an email two years later from Hillary Clinton to advisor John Podesta called for pressure against the Qatari and Saudi governments for their alleged financial support for ISIS.

"There are so many ironies here," Krauthammer said, "This is probably normal procedure inside an administration [or] bureaucracy."

"The charges...from Trump in particular against Hillary [are] precisely that she represents business as usual," he said. "You can defend Clinton and say 'this goes on all the time' [but] that 's the point."

"They are trying to wipe away this kind of culture of corruption. It's hard to deny there is a quid pro quo [involving Clinton and her allies] when the phrase 'quid pro quo' is used to describe the transaction in the documents."

Krauthammer called the WikiLeaks release the "camera in the sausage factory", a nod to former German chancellor Otto von Bismarck's famous phrase to describe government at work.

"Once you see it in black and white, the charge that Clinton represents a...corrupt business as usual, that accentuates the charges."


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