Ohio Gov. John Kasich has been criticized over the last 24 hours for his repeated interruptions and overall demeanor during Tuesday night's GOP debate. 

Frank Luntz said after the debate that his panel of GOP voters had the least favorable reaction he's ever recorded to a particular moment involving Kasich. 

Conservative columnist and author Michelle Malkin, meanwhile, said Kasich came off as "crabby" and "annoying" as he kept inserting himself into the conversation.

Kasich was asked about the negative responses by Sean Hannity, and he explained that he felt a lot of his opponents' ideas "don't add up" and must be called out.

He argued that if the GOP nominee cannot defend his or her positions in the fall, Hillary Clinton will become the 45th President of the United States.  

"I am very, very concerned about winning next fall. And there are a lot of ideas out there that simply don’t add up. And you know that when the bright light comes on next fall, that whoever the nominee is, is going to have to present their programs. If they don’t add up, if they’re not solid, then I’m very fearful that we won’t win the election," said Kasich. 

He said the party must put forward a conservative plan that "can stand the light of day."

Kasich said some of the candidates' tax cuts cannot be implemented without running up massive budget deficits.

"The numbers don't add up," said Kasich. 

On immigration, Kasich said the GOP cannot face off with Clinton on a platform that calls for mass deportations. 

"If this is the message of the Republican Party next fall: that we're gonna round these people up and ship 'em out, I gotta tell ya, I'm the governor of Ohio and I don't think you win Ohio with that kind of a message," he said. 

Watch the interview above and let us know what you think. Plus, hear from Carly Fiorina, tonight at 10p/1a ET on "Hannity."


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