In tonight's Talking Points Memo, Bill O'Reilly examined how the Internet makes evil stronger.


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"We are all living in a dangerous, fast-changing world," O'Reilly said. "Machines now dominate the lives of Americans and are also very useful tools to terrorists all over the world."

"The Factor" host pointed to recent comments from former President Bill Clinton, who warned that ISIS, Al Qaeda and other terror groups can now recruit, instill fear and instantly - and globally - publicize their homicidal exploits, all online.

O'Reilly noted it's not just terrorists in other countries who pose a threat, though.


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"On the home front, Home Depot has just announced that is has been hacked, and 56 million shoppers now have their information in cyber space," O'Reilly said, adding that comes on the heels of Target being hacked, the celebrity nude photo hacking scandal, Chinese hackers stealing information from U.S. military contractors and companies and Edward Snowden stealing national security secrets.

O'Reilly added that millions of American children are addicted to their cell phones, laptops and other devices.

"They can access almost anything. They can see the worst kind of pornography and violence, and there is little parents can do to stop it.  That’s a huge problem."


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"There is no question that for all the benefits of the net, evil is now flourishing there," O'Reilly warned, saying that children's interpersonal skills will weaken and narcissism will thrive in cyberspace.

"In the future, those who reject the online addiction will prosper. Those who succumb to it will fail. We are looking at a brave new world, and, believe me, you're going to have to be brave to endure it."


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