Bill O’Reilly tonight discussed a New York Times editorial which called for the legalization of marijuana.

O’Reilly said that the “unspoken marijuana play” is contained in the editorial:

The social costs of the marijuana laws are vast ... Even worse, the result is racist, falling disproportionately on young black men, ruining their lives and creating new generations of career criminals.

“There you have it,” O’Reilly said. “The left believes American law enforcement targets African Americans for drug prosecutions. Therefore they want drug sales to be categorized as nonviolent offenses and marijuana to be legalized. It's about race, not drugs.”


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“The Factor” host explained that legalizing marijuana leads to unintended consequences and signals to children that drug use is acceptable. He explained that a recent study by Yale School of Medicine found that adolescents who use pot or alcohol are three times more likely to abuse hard drugs.

O’Reilly also said that drug use and sales have devastated poor parts of America, so does it make sense to make these intoxicants even more available?

In New York City in 1990, there were 2,245 homicides, an average of six per day. In 2013, there were 335. O’Reilly explained that under Mayor Rudy Giuliani, police cracked down on open drug use and sales, thus lowering the murder rate, which was driven by the drug trade.


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“Apparently the New York Times and others want to go back to the good old days where there were six murders daily in the nation's largest city,” O’Reilly remarked.

O’Reilly called on the authorities to decriminalize pot use. “You want to do it in your house and not bother anyone, fine. Go outside with a joint, you pay a fine – a hefty one, if I’m running the show. But sell marijuana, you go to jail.”

“America used to have standards of behavior in public, but today they are collapsing all around us,” O’Reilly said.

Watch the full memo above.