As the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 reaches the one-week mark, investigators are now reportedly looking more closely at the possibility that the Boeing 777 was sabotaged or hijacked. According to Reuters, military radar data suggests the jetliner diverted from its Kuala Lumpur-to-Beijing flight path and instead turned to the west.

As the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 reaches the one-week mark, investigators are now reportedly looking more closely at the possibility that the Boeing 777 was sabotaged or hijacked.

According to Reuters, military radar data suggests the jetliner diverted from its Kuala Lumpur-to-Beijing flight path and instead turned to the west.

"What we can say is we are looking at sabotage, with hijack still on the cards," a senior Malaysian police official told Reuters.

An ABC News report, citing two U.S. unnamed U.S. officials, states that the U.S. government believes the plane's data reporting system and transponder were shut down separately, at 1:07 a.m. and 1:21 a.m.

Bill Hemmer discussed the latest developments with former CIA operative Mike Baker and former Department of Transportation Inspector General Mary Schiavo.

Schiavo says there is still no evidence that the transponders were intentionally turned off and no evidence of terrorism. She explained that it's still just "speculation" to think that the airliner was flown to a third country.

Baker said in today's society everyone expects the answers to be found quickly "like an episode of Lost or 24," and when the situation remains unresolved, conspiracy theories start to take hold.

Watch the experts' analysis in the video above.