UPDATE, 2:45p ET: Secretary of State John Kerry made an appearance at Wednesday's State Department briefing, reacting to increasing violence throughout Egypt.

"Today's events are deplorable, and they run counter to Egyptian aspirations for peace, inclusion, and genuine democracy. Egyptians inside and outside of the government need to take a step back. They need to calm the situation and avoid further loss of life," he said.

"We also strongly oppose a return to a state of emergency law, and we call on the government to respect basic human rights including freedom of peaceful assembly and due process under the law, and we believe the state of emergency should end as soon as possible," Kerry said, adding that violence is "not a solution ... in Egypt or anywhere else."

"Violence will not create a roadmap for Egypt's future. Violence only impedes the transition to an inclusive civilian government, a government chosen in free and fair elections that governs democratically consistent with the goals of the Egyptian revolution, and violence and continued political polarization will only further tear the Egyptian economy apart."

Kerry placed responsibility for peace-making on both opposition and government forces, saying, "All parties also share responsibility to avoid violence and to participate in a productive path towards a political solution. There will not be a solution through further polarization. There can only be a political solution by bringing people together with a political solution."


UPDATE, 1:05p ET: Sky News Network has confirmed that one of their veteran cameramen was shot and killed amidst the violence in Cairo. Mick Deane was 61 years old.


UPDATE, 12:20p ET: News has crossed the wires that Egypt's interim vice president has resigned amid deadly violence in the nation. We're awaiting a State Department briefing on the situation; in the meantime, the White House put out the following statement:

The United States strongly condemns the use of violence against protesters in Egypt. We extend our condolences to the families of those who have been killed, and to the injured. We have repeatedly called on the Egyptian military and security forces to show restraint, and for the government to respect the universal rights of its citizens, just as we have urged protesters to demonstrate peacefully. Violence will only make it more difficult to move Egypt forward on a path to lasting stability and democracy, and runs directly counter to the pledges by the interim government to pursue reconciliation. We also strongly oppose a return to a State of Emergency law, and call on the government to respect basic human rights such as freedom of peaceful assembly, and due process under the law. The world is watching what is happening in Cairo. We urge the government of Egypt - and all parties in Egypt - to refrain from violence and resolve their differences peacefully.


Violent clashes between pro-Morsi protesters and security forces across Egypt have resulted in around 100 deaths the injury of hundreds more, according to officials in the country. This occurred as forces stormed two pro-Morsi camps in the city of Cairo.

FoxNews.com reports the latest, below:

Hamdi Abdel Karim, an Egypt Health Ministry spokesman, told Reuters that 95 people were killed and 874 were injured in the violence.

Khaled el-Khateeb, an Egyptian Health Ministry official, earlier told the Associated Press that at least 28 people were killed in Cairo, 25 in Minya province south of the capital and one each in the cities of Alexandria, Assiut and Ban Suef. Sky News cameraman Mick Deane and Gulf News reporter Habiba Ahmed Abd Elaziz were among the dead. 

The violence prompted Egypt's Interim President, Adly Mansour, to declare a monthlong state of emergency, ordering the armed forces to support the police in efforts to restore law and order and protect state facilities.

The camps that were cleared Wednesday in Cairo had been the catalyst of protests since former President Mohammed Morsi was overthrown by the Egypt's military on July 3, with thousands calling for his reinstatement.

The Muslim Brotherhood's political arm, which backs Morsi, claimed that more than 500 protesters were killed and some 9,000 wounded in the two camps, but those figures could not be confirmed and nothing in Associated Press footage or local TV networks suggested such a high death toll.

Army troops did not take part in the two Cairo operations, but provided security. Police and army helicopters hovered over both sites as plumes of smoke rose over the city skyline hours after the police launched the simultaneous actions shortly after 7 a.m. local time.

"At 7 a.m. they came. Helicopters from the top and bulldozers from below. They smashed through our walls. Police and soldiers, they fired tear gas at children," Saleh Abdulaziz, a 39-year-old teacher, told Reuters."They continued to fire at protesters even when we begged them to stop."

A Reuters correspondent said pools of blood were everywhere, with dozens of people lying in the street after suffering bullet and birdshot wounds.

The smaller of the two camps was cleared of protesters by late morning, with most of them taking refuge in the nearby Orman botanical gardens, inside the sprawling campus of Cairo University and the zoo.

An Associated Press reporter at the scene said security forces were chasing the protesters inside the zoo. At one point, a dozen protesters, mostly men with beards wearing traditional Islamist garb, were seen handcuffed and sitting on a sidewalk under guard outside the university campus. The private ONTV network showed firearms and rounds of ammunition allegedly seized from protesters there.

Security forces later stormed the larger camp in the eastern Cairo district of Nasr City.

An Associated Press television video journalist there said he could hear the screams of women as a cloud of white smoke hung over the protest encampment. He said a bulldozer was removing mounds of sand bags and brick walls built earlier by the protesters as a defense line in their camp.

An alliance of pro-Morsi groups said the 17-year-old daughter of senior Muslim Brotherhood Mohammed el-Beltagy, Asmaa Mohammed el-Beltagy, was killed in the Nasr City raid. 

Islam Tawfiq, a Brotherhood member at the Nasr City sit-in, said that the camp's medical center was filled with dead bodies and that the injured included children.

"No one can leave and those who do are either arrested or beaten up," he told the Associated Press.

The pro-Morsi Anti-Coup alliance claimed that security forces used live ammunition in the raid, but the Interior Ministry, which is in charge of the police, said its forces only used tear gas and that they came under fire from protesters.

The Anti-Coup Alliance also said in a statement that 25 were killed at the Nasr City site, while the Muslim Brotherhood claims that 30 people had died there.

Read more at FoxNews.com, and stay tuned to Fox News Channel for more updates.