Presidential candidate Rick Santorum joined Fox News Sunday to discuss his campaign and preview this week’s Super Tuesday primary contests. Santorum said he believes he will do very well in Ohio’s primary, regardless of the money disadvantage. He said he and Gingrich are “slugging away” as the anti-Romney alternative.

Chris Wallace pressed Santorum on the current debate about birth control, showing a clip of Santorum saying he believes contraception is morally wrong. Santorum said that he’s reflecting the views of the church he believes in, and that the government should not be forcing people to do things that are against their conscience. He said, “The idea that the government can force people to do things that they believe are morally

wrong is something that was seen as an outrage.”


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Santorum defended his charitable contributions, which according to his 2010 tax returns he gave 1.76 percent of his income to charity, compared to Mitt Romney’s 13.8 percent and President Obama’s 14.2 percent. Santorum said his insurance company doesn’t cover his daughter’s health care needs, but that it’s an area that he needs to do better in.

On criticizing President Obama’s education policy and calling him a “snob”, Chris told Santorum that the president never actually said everybody should go to college but rather that every American should get at least one year of higher education or career training. Santorum said maybe he “read some columns where … the president said we should go to four year colleges … if it was an error then I agree with the president.”

Chris also brought up the GOP candidate's previous comments that he “took one for the team” when he voted for No Child Left Behind. Santorum said he supported it but then subsequently that he made a mistake. He said there were some things in the bill that he didn’t like, but about 90 percent of the Senate voted for it because there were some aspects that were needed.

So then why did he campaign for the Senate in 2006, using his support for the No Child Left Behind Act and calling it “the most historic legislative initiative enhancing education … to pass Congress in decades.” Santorum said he objected to the “explosion” of education spending, not the testing aspect of the bill which he thinks was an important factor in finding out that schools were failing.

Watch the full interview below: